Friday, March 26, 2021

In the Writing World, Are You a Moses or an Aaron?


By Lori Hatcher @LoriHatcher2 

Some compare writing a book (or a blog post, an article, or a poem) to giving birth. Others use the more picturesque description of a journey or a path. The most honest among us refer to it as a battle.

 

Moses, the author of five books of the Bible, knew about writing—and about battles. Exodus 17 describes a skirmish the Israelites had with the Amalekites.

 

“Moses said to Joshua, ‘Choose some of our men and go out to fight the Amalekites. Tomorrow I will stand on top of the hill with the staff of God in my hands.’

 

 “So Joshua fought the Amalekites as Moses had ordered, and Moses, Aaron and Hur went to the top of the hill. As long as Moses held up his hands, the Israelites were winning, but whenever he lowered his hands, the Amalekites were winning.

 

 “When Moses' hands grew tired, they took a stone and put it under him and he sat on it. Aaron and Hur held his hands up—one on one side, one on the other—so that his hands remained steady till sunset” (Ex. 17:9-12).

 

In the writing life, sometimes God calls us to be a Moses. Other times He calls us to be an Aaron.

 

Most of us have at least one Moses in our writing circles—the one with a bestselling book (or three), a platform big enough to support Texas stadium, and a heart to match it. They organize conferences and write books on craft. They lead the way by their faith and example. They forge paths in the writing wilderness.

 

We want to hate them, but we can’t. They’re just too darn loveable.

 

Sometimes, we get to be a Moses—on a smaller scale. Our freelance writing gets noticed by a publisher. Someone invites us to speak at a women’s retreat. The book we’ve been laboring over for years finally gets contracted. 

 

Most of the time, however, we’re Aarons. Aaron introduced Moses to the leaders of Israel and vouched for his credibility. He held Moses’ staff and stood beside him as he approached Pharaoh. He counseled him as he led others. He held up Moses’ arms when he grew weary. 

 

Aarons in the writing world offer support and share resources. They introduce their friends to their contacts and vouch for their writing ability. They stand beside them as they approach editors and publishers. They share their friends’ posts, recommend their articles, and help them with their social media. Aarons bring balloons and chocolate when the contract finally appears and bake cupcakes for the book launch. 

 

Aarons lift their friends’ hands to the keyboard when they’re too discouraged to type another word. They support them with their unflagging belief in their writing. They refuse to let them quit.

 

Sometimes God calls us to be a Moses, perched at the top of the mountain with God’s glory shining around us. Other times He calls us to be an Aaron, standing beside a friend in the midst of a writing battle and holding up their weary arms. 

 

Both roles are honorable. Both roles advance God’s kingdom. Both roles make God smile.


TWEETABLE

In the Writing World, Are You a Moses or an Aaron? - @LoriHatcher2 on @EdieMelson (Click to Tweet)

 

Lori Hatcher loves God even more than she loves chocolate—and that’s a lot. Since He saved her at age 18, she’s been on a relentless journey to know and love Him more. Her deepest desire is for her others to join her on the journey. As an author, blogger, and women’s ministry speaker, she writes for Our Daily Bread, Guideposts, Revive Our Hearts, andCrosswalk.com. She’s written three devotional books, including Refresh Your Faith, Uncommon Devotions from Every Book of the Bible, and Hungry for God…Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women. Connect with her at LoriHatcher.com or on Facebook, Twitter (@lorihatcher2) or Pinterest (Hungry for God).

23 comments:

  1. Lori: I love your reminder that both roles are honorable and both roles advance God's kingdom. Thank you for your encouraging, much-needed post.

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  2. Amen. You have been both a Moses and Aaron in my life, Lori.

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    1. As you have for me, Jeanne :) God’s blessings!

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  3. Great post, Lori! I love how God uses us to help one another in those times we need to be Aarons.

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  4. When I was younger, being a Moses had a lot of attraction. But now I'm more comfortable being an Aaron. But like you said, sometimes you are called to be one or another, and I find being a Moses scary. But if that's what my Father wants, then I've got to draw confidence from Him

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    1. Amen, JPC, where He calls us, He will equip us. And we can trust :)

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  5. What a beautiful perspective--so much truth! Thanks for sharing, Lori.

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    1. You are most welcome, Crystal. God's blessings on your writing!

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  6. It occurs to me that being an Aaron is what the church is all about. We are to use our gifts to build up each other (not ourselves). God has uniquely gifted each believer, and each of us is equally significant in the Body of Christ. I love that just about every writer I know, whether hugely successful or just starting out, has the desire to help their fellow writers along. Just as God designed the church to do!! So that God, not any individual, gets the glory every time. Thanks for this thoughtful post!

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    1. Julie, you are absolutely right. Working as a body, a family, for our Father's glory is what fulfills our purpose and brings Him (and us) joy. Blessings to you!

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  7. Lori, your post shows us that both roles are honorable and designed by God. Thank you for encouraging words. I met you on a mountainside (BRMCWC) when you wore a big badge that read, “How may I pray for you?” You’ve encouraged me many times since then.

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    1. Prayer is one of the highest and greatest ways we can support each of our writing friends. We can do it in person, like our precious time of prayer at BRMCWC, or from afar, but regardless, God hears and we are blessed. Thank you, Lord.

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  8. Thank you, Lori, for such a great post! Like someone said above, you've been a Moses and an Aaron in my life, and I can tally so many of my writer friends in both categories, too. It's one thing that I love about this writing journey, the support and encouragement that so many give so readily! I'm just really glad you're part of "my team" in so many ways!!! Love and hugs and blessings, my friend!

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    1. I learned early on, from Cindy Sproles and Eddie Jones, that when one member of the team "wins," we ALL win, because we're on God' team, for His glory. Love you, friend!

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    1. You are most welcome, Diana. Blessings to you!

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  10. I love your analogy, Lori, and we have to remember that while Moses was given the leadership position, he had to carry the great burden of the new nation of Israel with him. He and Aaron were constantly being challenged and criticized from within their own people.

    The favor of God comes with heavy responsibility, and I am more than grateful to the many people who have been "Moses" and "Aaron" to me in my writing life.

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  11. It is a great responsibility, Kay, and one we should never take lightly, whether we're the Moses or the Aaron. May we never take it lightly. Blessings to you, friend.

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  12. Lori,

    This word picture is outstanding for so many ministries, and definitely the writing journey. I can attest from personal experience that it is a huge joy and privilege to be an Aaron. I love being on of your Aaron’s! I’ve learned so much from you and have been tremendously encouraged. Yes, everyone needs both a Moses and an Aaron!! Love this!

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    1. It is a joy and a privilege to be part of God’s work through the writing world. So glad we get to walk the journey together, friend.

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  13. Lori, you are such a blessing and have been an Aaron to me. I can hold you up with prayer. What role are those who just stay in the fight? The people in the battle who win in the end because they didn't faint in the day of adversity? I think they have worth too. Thanks for sharing.

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