Friday, March 23, 2018

Don’t Be Surprised by Post Writing Conference Let Down

by Lori Hatcher @LoriHatcher2

It’s conference season. All over the country writers flock to writers conferences, hoping to learn secrets of the craft, pitch a new idea, and connect with fellow wordsmiths. Conferences can be both exhilarating and frightening.

Even the best conference experience, however, can leave you feeling let down. Let’s examine a few reasons why you might feel discouraged or depressed in the days following a really good writers conference.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Leaving a Legacy in Life & in Writing

by Henry McLaughlin @RiverBendSagas

Have you ever wondered about what kind of legacy you’re leaving? I mean more than an estate or an inheritance we bequeath to our children or our church.

I’m thinking more along the lines of how will people remember us. Maybe a better phrasing is how do we want to be remembered? Have you ever thought of that?

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

4 Ways to Start Your Nonfiction Book with Conflict

by Katy Kauffman @KatyKauffman28

We all want a happy ending. But no life reaches a happy ending without some conflict. That’s why we need novels and nonfiction books. We want to see someone overcome the odds and win the victory, find their true love, or solve the crime. We want to find proven answers to real-life problems. And so we read. We investigate. We learn, and we grow.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Writers Encourage Other Writers

by Lucinda Secret McDowell @LucindaSMcDowel

“Cindy, God has given you a gift of writing and it is your duty to write for Him!” (Elisabeth Elliot in a personal conversation)

Imagine being only 26-years-old and hearing those words from such a respected mentor, international speaker and author of 30 books. I had already felt a nudging from God on this path, but Elisabeth’s words helped confirm and encourage me further. Needless to say, I was a bit daunted, but also energized to pursue more training and opportunity (this occurred when I was heading off to Wheaton Graduate School of Communication after graduating from Gordon-Conwell Seminary.)

No one is more amazed than I that today—many years later—I can look back at my published work, by God’s grace: 13 books authored, 30+ books as contributing author and articles published in more than 50 magazines.

Monday, March 19, 2018

When & How to use Your Social Media for Marketing

by Molly Jo Realy @RealMoJo68

You’ve heard me say it nine cajillion eight thousand okay, a lot of times: media is not the same as marketing. All the Pros will tell you the same thing: if the only thing you’re doing is pushing your product, just open an online store.

Media is where you connect with your Swarm. It’s the different hives you foster, the communities you help build.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

Your Words Matter

by Andy Lee @WordsByAndyLee

 find one of the hardest parts of being a writer is the silence.

I’m not talking about the silent hours spent with only the tic-tock of the clock on my office wall and the pitter-patter of lap-top keys.  No, I’ve grown to love this silence, days with only my cat to keep me company.

It was not always this way. I’m an extrovert turned introvert by means of calling. When the Lord called me to write a book, I had no idea that it would become my ministry and career. Shifting from educator to full-time mom, to assistant pastor to all day writer, proved a challenge.

Saturday, March 17, 2018

When Our Dreams Collide with Life and Produce Writing

by Emme Gannon @GannonEmme

Love once blended with another. As one. Now fading as the mist of dawn. Dreams once pursued now silent. Like the still of a moonless night. Such is the exploding emotions when dreams fade.

Karen Blixen, who wrote by the pen name of Isak Dinesen, started her poignant biography, Out of Africa with, “I had a farm in Africa at the foot of the Ngong Hills.” She went on to passionately describe scenes that had fixed themselves in her heart and mind during the seventeen years of her life there. The day came when it was time to pack up the life she’d known and loved, store it in her heart, and move away. In saying goodbye to Africa, she penned, “If I know a song of Africa, I thought of the Giraffe, and the African new moon lying on her back, of the ploughs in the fields, and the sweaty faces of the coffee-pickers. Does Africa know a song of me?” She never returned but her book, Out of Africa, forever sings her love song of when she had a farm “at the foot of the Ngong Hills.”