Wednesday, August 31, 2016

What Does it Mean to be a Writer of Hope?

by Edie Melson @EdieMelson

I am a writer of hope
Being a writer of hope is something I’m making a deliberate effort to become. I think it’s something we all should consider. There is so much in our world these days that can lead to hopelessness if we let it.

Because our business is words, we have the ability to affect how others interpret the world. I’m not suggesting that we slant our viewpoint to something untrue, but rather that we take an honest look at the hope around us no matter what situation we’re viewing.

Being a Hope Writer Means:
  • Reminding others—and ourselves—that no matter what we’re facing, we can use it to make the world better or worse.
  • Reporting truth, but not forgetting that even the most difficult truth carries within it the seed of possibility.
  • Remembering to be kind. We should always take time to make sure what we’re writing isn’t running others down.
  • Remembering to be respectful. There are always two sides to every issue. Even when we disagree, we can do it without attacking one another.
  • Repeating the fact that no situation is ever permanently bad. We all face struggles and stress, but nothing lasts forever.
  • Redefining possibilities. Just as every situation has multiple possibilities, it’s our job as writers to bring those to light.
  • Releasing the misconceptions we hold onto so tightly. We have to first take an honest look around us before we can share truth with others.
  • Reinventing our own personal attitude. Unless we subscribe to the attitude of hope, it’s hard to encourage others.
  • Reminding others of God’s ability to redeem anyone and any situation.

These are the precepts I’m trying to apply to every thing I write. What would you add to the list? Be sure to leave your thoughts in the the comments section below.

Don’t forget to join the conversation!
Blessings,
Edie

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20 comments:

  1. Edie, this is what I want to be: a writer of hope for those who think they have been forgotten. I love this post, especially the one about "reinventing our own personal attitude." How can I help others feel validated, if I don't feel that way, too? It's hard to adjust your own attitude first, but it has to be done.

    Thanks Edie! Bookmarking this one!

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    1. I love it when my characters encourage me. I'm a pantser so I don't always know what they're going to say, or what they're thinking. But Father does, and He speaks to me through them. And through others' writing.
      You're so right, Angie, and Edie, we have to set our own attitude so that it shows in our writing.

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    2. Angie and Robin, thank you! Blessings to you both! E

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  2. Now that I'm focusing on middle grade, I try to remind young readers that they are not alone in the way they think or feel. I remember thinking something was wrong with me when I first started finding girls interesting, or that I loved writing stories (okay, maybe that is a bit weird). I want my readers to know that they are going through nothing alone.

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    1. Ron, that's a great thing to be deliberate about and a super way to be a hope writer. Thanks for sharing, E

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  3. Edie, We all need hope. Thank you for the reminder. My blog this week is about hope and expectations. I pray that God uses my mistakes to help and encourage others.

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    1. Cherrilynn, don't you love it when God multiplies the message through others? Blessings, E

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  4. I use unusual characters with unique challenges to show that everyone is worthy of love and should never give up hope. My paranormal novels place an emphasis on the importance of family. The books break the rules of the genre and some readers don't like the stories at all. Nevertheless, I can't write anything that doesn't involve faith, hope, love--and most importantly, acceptance. Thanks, Edie.

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    1. Linda, that's a great way to be a hope writer! Blessings, E

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  5. Thank you for these wonderful reminders. Years ago, stories led me to Christ--long before any person did. That is what I pray my stories will do--lead others to His hope.

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    1. Tama, that'a powerful testimony, thank you for sharing! Blessings, E

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  6. As a fellow writer of hope, I've sure been enjoying your blog, Edie. I'm finding that the starting point of "Reminding others" is being inclusive. Like you've done above by using the word "we." Perhaps an aspect of hope is the sense that each of us is part of a larger community facing similar struggles. We're not alone in it.
    Thank you for putting this into words and creating a "hope writers" template!

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    1. Kit, I'm so glad you're enjoying it. And you're right, being inclusive is very important. Thanks for dropping by! Blessings, E

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  7. Thanks for this list, Edie. It hits home on many levels. I would add: reminding others that we don't have to settle for the way things are, they can always be better.

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  8. Wish more folks would follow these rule on Facebook. I try very hard to be positive, especially those with whom I disagree. Thanks for the reminders.

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    1. Robert, you are so right! FB can be a minefield of negativity. Blessings, E

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  9. What a timely list - and I am forever grateful that Hope springs eternal... all the best, Nancy

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  10. This article struck a chord with me. As a writer who receives rejection letters, it is sometimes difficult to feel hopeful. But, as a Christian writer, I need to write what will bring hope to others. If we trust God, there is always hope for He does work "in everything for good for those who love Him," Romans 8:28.

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