Monday, February 16, 2015

8 Tips for Those with Social Media Commitment Issues

by Edie Melson @EdieMelson

We all know it’s important for writers to have a solid presence online. 

But many of us struggle with Social Media commitment issues. We have good intentions, but our follow-through may be less than stellar. 

So today I’d like to share some tips to help you stay on track.

Stay Committed to Social Media
1. Set Reasonable Expectations. I think this is the most important piece of advice I can give you. When I first started blogging, I wanted to excel at it. So my inclination was to set the bar high, posting at least five times a week. But the more I thought about it, the more I realized I might not be able to keep up. So instead I started slow, posting once a week, and only adding more days to my schedule when I knew I could handle it. It has been the smartest thing I’ve ever done. I’ve managed all my social media this way, and I believe it’s the one thing that has contributed the most to my success.

We can't do it all, and we really can't do it all at once.
2. Don’t try to do it all at once. Along with reasonable expectations, don’t try to jump into everything at once. I began with blogging, moved into Facebook, and then into Twitter. Taking things one at a time helps you establish good habits without overburdening yourself.

3. Don’t try to do it all. It’s important to find a few things that you like with social media and stick with those. As I’m writing this, there are approximately 123 social media platforms. Five minutes from now that number will change. We can’t all do everything. Find the networks that work for you and concentrate on those instead of chasing every new things that comes up.

4. Diversify. Yes, stick with only a few. But make sure you are spreading your social media time between several networks. We all know that things change, and that’s true with social media. If you have all your social media eggs in one basket, you can get burned when those changes occur.

5. Give yourself a break. Trust me, life happens. There are going to be days when you won’t be able to give the time you want to social media. Relax, it will be fine. Kids get sick, deadlines appear, and tragedies strike. Keep your priorities reasonable and learn to be gentle with yourself.

6. Set a time limit. Remember social media is the means to an end. It’s the way to connect to your audience. Use it as a tool, but don’t spend all your time on it. Most of all, don’t let it interfere with your commitment to writing.

7. Celebrate your successes. It’s easy to get discouraged when the numbers move slowly. But small consistent steps will get you where you want to go. So celebrate the process.

8. Remember they’re people, not numbers. Yes, we want to improve our platform, but don’t focus on the numbers, focus on the relationships. After all, that’s why we’re doing this.

These are the things I use to help overcome my social media commitment issues. I’d love to hear your tips, too. Be sure to leave them in the comments section below.

Don’t forget to join the conversation!
Blessings,
Edie

TWEETABLES




14 comments:

  1. These tips are awesome, Edie. They give me great ideas for managing my social media time and content. They also give the sense and comfort that this social media stuff is do-able.

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    1. Henry, I'm glad some of these can help! Blessings, E

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  2. Awesome post, Edie. Social media can really take up too much time and all of your tips make sense, so thanks! I'll be sharing your post on Facebook.

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    1. Darlene, it really can be a time waster if we're not careful! Thanks for stopping by, Blessings, E

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  3. I learned to set time limits a few years ago. I'd gotten on Twitter and Facebook and found myself spending way too much time there. Now I jump in 3 or 4 times a day for no more than 5 minutes at a time, sometimes less than that. Then in the evening, while I watch TV, my laptop is nearby and during commercials, I jump online. :)

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    1. Ane, I think you and I manage social media in almost the same way! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Blessings, E

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  4. Edie, thanks for the encouragement and direction. I appreciate what you do (and admire you for it).

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  5. I attended the last Writer to Writer conference and was given great advice. Write 50 minutes out of the hour and use the other 10 for social media, emails etc. I am utilizing this advice. Thank you for this article.

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  6. Thank you Edie. Your grace always calms me down when I get myself bent out of shape trying to do it all at once. I will take this advice to heart and focus on building good habits.

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  7. The more involved you become in your writing career, the more demanding social media becomes. I've found it difficult and challenging to keep up with...but I'm trying to set more reasonable expectations for myself. Thanks for the tips!

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  8. I've been in your "school of social media" for a while and have learned tons! I'm so grateful for all you share with us. My biggest challenge seems to be trying too much at once and keeping my self-imposed commitments. I've approached SM much like I've approached many diets. Sigh. I'm a work in progress.

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  9. Interaction, authenticity and a bit of humor go a long way on social media. Nobody really likes a monologue.

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  10. This is a very helpful post, Edie! And I couldn’t agree more with number eight. Although numbers may define online rankings and visibility, sometimes it doesn’t automatically mean that you have a high reputation on your business niche. That is something you build up online and offline through networking and good customer service. What is numbers anyway, if you couldn’t create a rapport among your audiences? Thanks again for sharing your thoughts on the matter!

    Tom Hall @ WCS Solutions

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  11. Those pointers would really come in handy for anyone who is having difficulties in committing with social media. Each and every advice you mentioned are equally important, but the thing that struck me the most is setting reasonable expectations when you’re just learning the ropes of this strategy. Thank you for sharing with us, Edie!

    Porter Sommers @ Plumb Marketing

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